Fast RMX

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8.8

Great

Fast RMX
Fast RMX

There is very little not to like about Fast RMX. If you dumped a lot of hours into Fast Racing or Fast Racing Neo, ok, maybe there's not enough content here for you to warrant a re-purchase, but I don't think anyone is seriously in that boat. Instead, what you have is a really compelling, slick racer that gets the core gameplay done right and does it in style. For Switch owners, consider it a priority release.

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At $20, Fast RMX represents one of the best values on the Switch at launch thanks to its gripping futuristic racing gameplay and smooth visuals. I didn’t realize this until I read more about it, but it’s actually a re-vamped and updated Fast Racing Neo that was out on the Wii, with RMX including all the DLC and with an upcoming free update to enable Time Trial mode.

If you couldn’t tell from the logo and the screenshots, this is essentially an F-Zero or Wipeout title that puts racers in a sleek, futuristic ride across more than two dozen tracks. In fact, there are thirty total tracks in RMX, six are all new, with the previous (fifteen) vehicles and racing tiers included. Modes of play are reasonably limited, especially given that it’s a $20 digital-only launch title. You probably wouldn’t expect a deep story here because this is a game you fire up for the raw sense of speed and thrill you get, and that it can provide in spades across Exhibition, Multiplayer, and Championship modes (with the Time Trial DLC coming for free, soon). Limited multiplayer testing conducted worked very well, I played with the Switch docked and enjoyed silky smooth framerates playing split screen competitive play with a buddy. There is basic online support too whereby races are randomly created, but what little I have tested online has worked quite well. LAN play is also supported where each player has their own Switch, and this sounds cool and I’d bet it works great, but I was not able to test this.


Instead, I spent most of my time playing the Championship mode which of course includes all thirty tracks and three different Cups, each increasingly harder than the next. The variety of locations that Fast RMX takes you to always impressed me, from futuristic cities to tracks to wet almost jungle or forest themed stages, the variety is appreciable. Regardless of location, speed wins, and kills, but I definitely found this game to be either more forgiving than some other futuristic racers I have played in the past. That’s not to say you don’t have to bring your A game to the harder difficulties, but Fast RMX isn’t going to bust your chops too badly if you encounter one of the well-used environmental hazards or miss a high-flying jump because you didn’t change your Phase quick enough. I thought the controls and gameplay were immediately accessible and players can get traction within the tracks quickly without feeling sidelined by overly punishing AI. I liked this.

Heck, generally speaking, there is very little not to like about Fast RMX. If you dumped a lot of hours into Fast Racing or Fast Racing Neo, ok, maybe there’s not enough content here for you to warrant a re-purchase, but I don’t think anyone is seriously in that boat. Instead, what you have is a really compelling, slick racer that gets the core gameplay done right and does it in style. For Switch owners, consider it a priority release.
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8.8

Great