Game Reviews PlayStation 3 The Fight: Lights Out

The Fight: Lights Out Steven McGehee Hot

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Written by Steven McGehee     November 13, 2010    
 
4.8
 
9.2 (2)
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Console (if any)
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Release Date
November 09, 2010
Storage Size
1.5GB
MSRP $
39.99
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Players
Online?

The Fight: Lights Out is the latest game built specifically for the PS Move. Requiring two PS Move Remotes/Controllers (which act as your fists), The Fight casts gamers as an up-and-coming underground fighter. Veteran tough guy actor Danny Trejo will offer you guidance on your journey via full motion video cutscenes, but ultimately it's up to you to battle the dozens of characters that the game throws at you. As it turns out, you'll be fighting the game itself as much as anything it or an online opponent can throw at you.

Round 1

The Fight experience begins with character creation which asks you to input your height, weight, and age (so that it can give you your BMI). Then, it's off to Appearance customization in which you get to choose from several body types that you can alter with different hair styles, clothing, tattoos, jewelry, pants, and so forth -- most of these items have to be unlocked as you might expect. Next, you can distribute your initial batch of 60 skill points across these Abilities: Strength, Speed, Stamina, Chin, Heart, and Technique.

Next up is the calibration process. This process is longer than the one you have to do before every fight. The game will ask you to point each remote at the screen and press the Move button. Then you will simulate a few punches. Next, you're asked to clear the room so the game can take a snapshot of your environment. It will give you results on background movement and lighting, and it will also tell you if head-tracking is available given these conditions. For some reason, my environment never allowed me to use head tracking, meaning I couldn't sway to dodge (although I could usually duck). My lighting rank was always great as was my background, but head-tracking was always "Terrible" which I found perplexing. Anyway, after that, you hold out each remote on either side of your body, press each button, then take a casual fight stance with the remotes tucked under your chin, and press a button. These latter two steps have to be done in between each fight.

As Danny Trejo will tell you, do not move once you're calibrated. During a fight, you have to keep your feet planted. Not only is this a upper-body only fighting game, but if you move around while you're fighting, accuracy goes (further) out the door. You can recalibrate during the fight, but, just don't move... it'll be easier that way. That said, I didn't find staying stationary to be a big problem, but there are however two major issues with the gameplay itself.

 

FLO-1



First, and you'll notice this right away in the tutorial, the game seems like it's running at half speed. Every action you perform, while it may be in full speed in your living room, is like punching underwater on screen. I never got far enough in the game to max out my Speed, but I just thought that that was nuts. Maybe later the speed of my character actually matches what I am doing for real, but it's a shame I have to hope and find out. It should be tracking my velocity in real time from the get-go, period. I definitely don't remember the gameplay being this slow at E3, either.

Secondly, as is practically always the case with motion gaming on any platform, there is a considerable amount of inaccuracy. No matter how many times I redid a full calibration, I found myself having to punch either below my face or even above it in one really bad scenario to get my hits connecting with the face of my opponent. That's something I could have gotten used to barring the other problems, but these issues combined make this a very tough game to enjoy. Certain other gameplay designs don't help matters.

The Fight actually includes a stamina meter for your character, which as other reviewers have pointed out, is silly. I'm supposed to be the character; I'm the one throwing the punches, right? Make no mistake, The Fight will get you breaking a sweat as you swing punch after punch. But as the player, it seems right to me that I should be the one who controls the stamina, not the game itself. My character may be out of juice but if I'm still trying to throw punches, why shouldn't I be able to?

The control scheme and what moves are available to you when was also disappointing. To move in a certain direction, you press the Move button and tilt the controller in that direction. Believe it or not, it's cumbersome to do that as much as you actually have to do that in game. Additionally, despite being able to cycle through multiple over the shoulder and above camera angles at anytime with Triangle, I found it difficult to tell how close my opponent was. That's another thing I like about Fighters Uncaged on Kinect actually, in that it pops up a visual cue to inform you of the distance. But yeah, trying to flick the remote forward to get in closer to your foe or trying to sidestep just doesn't fit. The rest of the time you're throwing these full speed punches (which of course are going much slower in the game) and then to have to do these little controller tweaks just to get your opponent back in front of you isn't smooth at all.

I was also a bit surprised at how much T button action there was to help the game distinguish the different movements (backfist, elbow, etc.). Having to use the T button isn't a deal breaker but it definitely takes you out of the action a little bit further, especially when combined with the other gameplay snags. Not to mention, it doesn't work as consistently as you'd hope.

I also didn't like the Rage meter and Dirty Moves concept. Since when is a hammerfist a dirty move? Besides, I thought this was no holds underground fighting? Biting and uppercuts to the groin would seem like dirty moves, but a hammerfist or headbutt (and others)? It seemed very arbitrary to me, but basically what this does is practically limit you to straight punches while you build up your Rage meter, at which point you're then allowed to execute these "dirty moves." Having to keep an eye on the Rage meter while you fight is just another bad decision. If you try to do a dirty move before you have enough Rage, your character will just do something that doesn't mimic what you did at all. For example, if you don't have enough Rage built up for a hammerfist, he'll just extend his arm out, harmlessly, and uselessly. So now I have to keep track of my health, stamina, and rage meter, when it reality, this game should have been HUD-free and just used visual cues of and on the fighters themselves. More blood, limping, welts and bruises, heavy breathing and staggering would all have been great ways to help keep players attuned to the state of the fighters. Instead you've got meters to keep an eye on.

 

FLO-2

 

TKO

So single player mode has several options including the tournament which is spreadout across twelve different areas like an underpass, chapel, and warehouse. After your first fight, five of these areas are selectable and there are about a dozen fights to win in each. As you win each fight, the next fight opens up, until you get to the boss of that area. Each fight has some kind of criteria for you to try and complete such as winning with only taking a certain amount of damage or within a certain time limit and so forth. You can also place wagers on fights, kind of like (but not as deep as) the old PSP game The Con. Betting in fights helps you earn money quicker. Money is used to go to the gym to earn Skill Points to spend on your Abilities. Money is also used to fix up Injuries which you should tend to in between fights. Injuries occur on your torso and head and they have an effect on your stamina in the next fight if you don't pay to get them healed.

I should also point out that you can earn Boosters like Thunder, Survivor, and Clubber which alter your Strength, Heart, and Hammerfirst efficiency for example. You can also purchase Cheats from the Extras menu for $1 each; these give you extra strength and speed and so on. I imagine these don't work in multiplayer but I wasn't about to waste a buck to find out.

The multiplayer component of The Fight allows for local split screen competition and online play. Online matches can be either ranked or unranked or you can just spectate and place bets which is kind of neat. There isn't much of an online presence at this time, but that may change as more people get the Move.

As for the presentation, The Fight looks fine to me, I wasn't expecting some Unreal 3 powered blockbuster or anything. Danny Trejo as "Duke" is also okay by me. The sounds in game are alright, but the hip-hop music seemed out of place and reminded me of Def Jam: Fight For New York for some reason. Ultimately, the presentation is fine, I just wish the darn game worked better than it does. Maybe a patch to fix the speed issues would help mask some of the tracking/inaccuracy problems which I imagine could be harder to patch.

To the summary...

Editor reviews

I still have hope that a game like this can really work and be really fun -- but The Fight: Lights Out isn't it. There are simply too many things wrong with this game to recommend it.
Overall rating 
 
4.8
Gameplay 
 
3.0
Presentation 
 
7.0
Value  
 
5.0
Fun Factor 
 
4.0
Tilt 
 
5.0
Steven McGehee Reviewed by Steven McGehee November 13, 2010
Top 10 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (896)

The Fight: Lights Out

I still have hope that a game like this can really work and be really fun -- but The Fight: Lights Out isn't it. There are simply too many things wrong with this game to recommend it.

Videogames

Gameplay
I like the idea, but the execution is terrible. Inaccurate controls, bad gameplay design (with stamina meter and 'dirty moves' and control scheme), and very slow moving characters.
Presentation
It's fine, nothing amazing of course, but they get the job done.
Value
You could definitely do worse with $40 and I still have hope that some patches will be released to help this game out. But, if you like the game as it is, there is a long single player mode and multiplayer support. Also, while some would argue that this doubles as a fitness game, I would remind folks that standing still and throwing punches is not an efficient way to burn calories at all.
Fun Factor
As much as I wanted to like this game, it's got too much going against it to make that possible.
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Average user rating from: 2 user(s)

Overall rating 
 
9.2
Gameplay 
 
9.0  (2)
Presentation 
 
8.0  (2)
Value  
 
9.5  (2)
Fun Factor 
 
9.5  (2)
Tilt 
 
10.0  (2)
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The Fight: Lights Out is an interesting title. It seems to have earned the near universal praise of the users and the scorn of the casual game reviewer. The why of that lies in the game's overall approach to fighting, and how sharply a true 1:1 game smashes the expectations of reviewers used to motion gaming designed for the general audience instead of a very specific one.

I bought up my Move and this game for only reason. I wanted a game that'd keep me thinking about sparring and keep me moving since I haven't been able to make it to my martial arts classes for several weeks due to a new job. I wanted to keep moving in a productive manner, and The Fight is perfect for this.

The Fight is specifically designed for someone who knows how to fight. Basic stuff like keeping your hands/guard up, maximizing your punching power by landing a well timed counter, none of that is important in Wii Boxing or Punch Out. Those games are in essence fancy quick time events. In The Fight, how successful a strike is, how well you defend, all of that is on you. It's the ultimate sandbox fighting game. You can do almost anything, but like in a real fight, if you don't know what you're really supposed to be doing, you're going to have a hard time.

The simple straight jab for example. A neophyte will just stick their arm out and call that a good punch. The Fight is actively looking for the player to punch with good form. When you throw a proper jab, the damage dealt increases noticeably. The same issue pops up for uppercuts and hooks. Good technique leads to faster response from the game and better damage. Landing a solid counter punch does more damage yet.

Movement isn't the trade-off a lot of reviewers have made it out to be. You hit the move button and slightly tilt one Move or the other slightly forward or back, and that's plenty to get your fighter moving. You can maintain guard and still punch while moving. There's no reason to sacrifice defense or offense just because you're moving. The game is quite versatile in this respect. It does take some practice, but this movement system is in no way bad.

The other source of much derisive hooting has been the presence of the stamina bar. Personally, I think this is a great addition to the game. Sparring against a resisting opponent is far more taxing than punching air. A fighter in a ring is definitely going to tire faster than some guy waving his arms around in his living room. The stamina meter also acts as a balancing mechanism. If someone wanted to just spazz out at you with a barrage of punches with no stamina considerations, the game would quickly dissolve into a mindless slugfest where the only real consideration would be who has the highest stats. You can see the stamina bar working against those inclined to spazz out online already.

It also introduces other strategic considerations. For example; In the last arena, I was pitted against a guy with brass knuckles. He hit me solidly with an uppercut while I was lining up a left hook. It broke my ribs, and my stamina meter went from nearly full to red in an instant. I was forced to back off and try to regain my composure. My fighter was seriously hurt though, and I had to engage in a desperate game of mouse and cat for what felt like forever before I finally eked out a win with a desperate flurry doled out in the midst of a red haze (I was at zero stamina the duration of that flurry) once I cornered the guy.

In another fight, I got grabbed. The tradeoff for a hold is that your stamina bar wears down as you work to maintain your grip. The biker I was fighting grabbed me, but I was able to pummel him until he was forced to release me, and he was redlined for his trouble. The stamina meter helps keep those dirty moves in check and discourages potential hugfests since the tradeoff is a drained stamina bar.

The game's HUD can be switched off, and there are loads of audio and visual cues to indicate how the fight is going. When your character is low on stamina, you can hear him gasping for breath. If that wasn't hint enough the screen will start pulsing red like your man's about to pass out. If you get hit especially hard, you will stagger. If you land an especially damaging shot on an opponent they will react accordingly as well. If you knock the wind out of them with a gut punch, they'll clutch their belly for example. The opponent will also start breathing heavy and drop their hands when exhausted. There is also real time damage that shows up on your character and the opponent. There's no real need to watch the HUD unless you have some demented obsession with spamming dirty moves which isn't necessary at all.

I do understand the complaints about the calibration however. When the game is on, it's dead bang awesome at capturing 1:1 movement. When it's off, it's intensely frustrating. I found that the major contributing factor to my issues was the light levels in my background. Any lamps or other light sources that appear on screen compete with the lights on the Moves and can confuse the PS Eye. So if you have a lamp on, and your punching arc for a hook coincides with the light int he background, you'll probably end up with your fighter losing calibration, or throwing an excessively weak or off target punch. This also happened with especially bright sunbeams playing on the wall behind me. If you watch yourself in the calibration screen, you can see where the Move will have trouble in situations like this as there will be no real difference in contrast between the Move's light and the sunny patch. In all the Move works great with that game as long as you have no back lighting.

I've had very little luck getting the head tracking to work at night. I do get it to work during the day when I can take advantage of direct sunlight however. You seem to need very good front lighting and a very simple background that contrasts well with your image to successfully get the head tracking to work well. This is where I ding the game a few points in the game play department. Head tracking is extremely useful for slipping punches. You can still do it to an extent with just the Moves, but you can't bob or weave with the precision that active head tracking affords. Ducking is also the best way to deliver a body blow, and that's out with head tracking disabled as far as I can tell.

As far as the music and presentation go, the music's ok I guess. The provided Euro rap tunes (way to toss out any gravitas the game might have had dev's) have a good rhythm to fight to, but I usually opt for my own custom play lists which The Fight also supports. The graphics are gritty, and the game's largely in black and white save for a few slashes of red framed by a grainy patina. It comes together stylistically well enough, but after The Shadow, Sin City etc, the effect's growing cliched.

In all, I think The Fight is a worthy game, and easily the best fighting game built around motion controls to date. If you don't mind learning how to fight properly, this game ought to entertain you and get you sweating. If you can't be bothered to learn how to throw a decent punch, there are plenty of games out there that do that for you already.
Overall rating 
 
8.8
Gameplay 
 
8.0
Presentation 
 
8.0
Value  
 
9.0
Fun Factor 
 
9.0
Tilt 
 
10.0
Reviewed by Joe Ottoson November 24, 2010

The Fight: Weeding Out the Boys From the Men

The Fight: Lights Out is an interesting title. It seems to have earned the near universal praise of the users and the scorn of the casual game reviewer. The why of that lies in the game's overall approach to fighting, and how sharply a true 1:1 game smashes the expectations of reviewers used to motion gaming designed for the general audience instead of a very specific one.

I bought up my Move and this game for only reason. I wanted a game that'd keep me thinking about sparring and keep me moving since I haven't been able to make it to my martial arts classes for several weeks due to a new job. I wanted to keep moving in a productive manner, and The Fight is perfect for this.

The Fight is specifically designed for someone who knows how to fight. Basic stuff like keeping your hands/guard up, maximizing your punching power by landing a well timed counter, none of that is important in Wii Boxing or Punch Out. Those games are in essence fancy quick time events. In The Fight, how successful a strike is, how well you defend, all of that is on you. It's the ultimate sandbox fighting game. You can do almost anything, but like in a real fight, if you don't know what you're really supposed to be doing, you're going to have a hard time.

The simple straight jab for example. A neophyte will just stick their arm out and call that a good punch. The Fight is actively looking for the player to punch with good form. When you throw a proper jab, the damage dealt increases noticeably. The same issue pops up for uppercuts and hooks. Good technique leads to faster response from the game and better damage. Landing a solid counter punch does more damage yet.

Movement isn't the trade-off a lot of reviewers have made it out to be. You hit the move button and slightly tilt one Move or the other slightly forward or back, and that's plenty to get your fighter moving. You can maintain guard and still punch while moving. There's no reason to sacrifice defense or offense just because you're moving. The game is quite versatile in this respect. It does take some practice, but this movement system is in no way bad.

The other source of much derisive hooting has been the presence of the stamina bar. Personally, I think this is a great addition to the game. Sparring against a resisting opponent is far more taxing than punching air. A fighter in a ring is definitely going to tire faster than some guy waving his arms around in his living room. The stamina meter also acts as a balancing mechanism. If someone wanted to just spazz out at you with a barrage of punches with no stamina considerations, the game would quickly dissolve into a mindless slugfest where the only real consideration would be who has the highest stats. You can see the stamina bar working against those inclined to spazz out online already.

It also introduces other strategic considerations. For example; In the last arena, I was pitted against a guy with brass knuckles. He hit me solidly with an uppercut while I was lining up a left hook. It broke my ribs, and my stamina meter went from nearly full to red in an instant. I was forced to back off and try to regain my composure. My fighter was seriously hurt though, and I had to engage in a desperate game of mouse and cat for what felt like forever before I finally eked out a win with a desperate flurry doled out in the midst of a red haze (I was at zero stamina the duration of that flurry) once I cornered the guy.

In another fight, I got grabbed. The tradeoff for a hold is that your stamina bar wears down as you work to maintain your grip. The biker I was fighting grabbed me, but I was able to pummel him until he was forced to release me, and he was redlined for his trouble. The stamina meter helps keep those dirty moves in check and discourages potential hugfests since the tradeoff is a drained stamina bar.

The game's HUD can be switched off, and there are loads of audio and visual cues to indicate how the fight is going. When your character is low on stamina, you can hear him gasping for breath. If that wasn't hint enough the screen will start pulsing red like your man's about to pass out. If you get hit especially hard, you will stagger. If you land an especially damaging shot on an opponent they will react accordingly as well. If you knock the wind out of them with a gut punch, they'll clutch their belly for example. The opponent will also start breathing heavy and drop their hands when exhausted. There is also real time damage that shows up on your character and the opponent. There's no real need to watch the HUD unless you have some demented obsession with spamming dirty moves which isn't necessary at all.

I do understand the complaints about the calibration however. When the game is on, it's dead bang awesome at capturing 1:1 movement. When it's off, it's intensely frustrating. I found that the major contributing factor to my issues was the light levels in my background. Any lamps or other light sources that appear on screen compete with the lights on the Moves and can confuse the PS Eye. So if you have a lamp on, and your punching arc for a hook coincides with the light int he background, you'll probably end up with your fighter losing calibration, or throwing an excessively weak or off target punch. This also happened with especially bright sunbeams playing on the wall behind me. If you watch yourself in the calibration screen, you can see where the Move will have trouble in situations like this as there will be no real difference in contrast between the Move's light and the sunny patch. In all the Move works great with that game as long as you have no back lighting.

I've had very little luck getting the head tracking to work at night. I do get it to work during the day when I can take advantage of direct sunlight however. You seem to need very good front lighting and a very simple background that contrasts well with your image to successfully get the head tracking to work well. This is where I ding the game a few points in the game play department. Head tracking is extremely useful for slipping punches. You can still do it to an extent with just the Moves, but you can't bob or weave with the precision that active head tracking affords. Ducking is also the best way to deliver a body blow, and that's out with head tracking disabled as far as I can tell.

As far as the music and presentation go, the music's ok I guess. The provided Euro rap tunes (way to toss out any gravitas the game might have had dev's) have a good rhythm to fight to, but I usually opt for my own custom play lists which The Fight also supports. The graphics are gritty, and the game's largely in black and white save for a few slashes of red framed by a grainy patina. It comes together stylistically well enough, but after The Shadow, Sin City etc, the effect's growing cliched.

In all, I think The Fight is a worthy game, and easily the best fighting game built around motion controls to date. If you don't mind learning how to fight properly, this game ought to entertain you and get you sweating. If you can't be bothered to learn how to throw a decent punch, there are plenty of games out there that do that for you already.

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This game is all about full 1 on 1 movement and tracking of your body in a fighting game, all these reviewers giving it 2/10 and 5/10 are either lazy that don't like to move or sweat (most likely) or just so inept at there general coordination they can't work out how to throw a decent jab or hook to save themselves.

Your movements are perfectly tracked in this game, the reason these reviewers think the tracking is off is because for a beginning character with 0/100 in strength/speed/agility they are purposefully slower and not as responsive. To begin with its not nearly as bad as they say its quite fun and does work fine from the start, but once you upgrade your character you can run in jab with speed, which ranges the target then you can very accurately work out when to step in and throw a upper cut that lands or a couple of powerful hooks to do some nice damage. The tracking is FLAWLESS no lag no inaccuracies, the head tracking only works on plan backgrounds but with that turned off the game plays perfectly anyways.

I've had more fun exercising on this than I've ever had, I want to keep playing it and playing it but my body is too sore and tired, 2 hours a day 4 days in a row tells you how much fun I'm having on this game. And now I'm upgrading my player in the gym for Multiplayer and having some seriously good on-line fights. Really fun multiplayer you get some hard fights where you have to change strategy mid game, I almost lost two fights to better trained/upgraded opponents but I got really dirty and used headlocks, elbows and head butts and managed to out fight them and win with 5% health left. You sweat your butt off and its a lot of fun.

Forget the bad reviews they are all WRONG, check user ratings they are all 8-10 out of 10, but the reviewers who play it for 1 hour without two move controlers give it 3-5 out of 10. Get this game or rent it, but get two move controllers and wear gym shorts and be ready to burn some fat.

Overall rating 
 
9.6
Gameplay 
 
10.0
Presentation 
 
8.0
Value  
 
10.0
Fun Factor 
 
10.0
Tilt 
 
10.0
Reviewed by Steven November 17, 2010

If you want to get fit in a fun way this game is a

This game is all about full 1 on 1 movement and tracking of your body in a fighting game, all these reviewers giving it 2/10 and 5/10 are either lazy that don't like to move or sweat (most likely) or just so inept at there general coordination they can't work out how to throw a decent jab or hook to save themselves.

Your movements are perfectly tracked in this game, the reason these reviewers think the tracking is off is because for a beginning character with 0/100 in strength/speed/agility they are purposefully slower and not as responsive. To begin with its not nearly as bad as they say its quite fun and does work fine from the start, but once you upgrade your character you can run in jab with speed, which ranges the target then you can very accurately work out when to step in and throw a upper cut that lands or a couple of powerful hooks to do some nice damage. The tracking is FLAWLESS no lag no inaccuracies, the head tracking only works on plan backgrounds but with that turned off the game plays perfectly anyways.

I've had more fun exercising on this than I've ever had, I want to keep playing it and playing it but my body is too sore and tired, 2 hours a day 4 days in a row tells you how much fun I'm having on this game. And now I'm upgrading my player in the gym for Multiplayer and having some seriously good on-line fights. Really fun multiplayer you get some hard fights where you have to change strategy mid game, I almost lost two fights to better trained/upgraded opponents but I got really dirty and used headlocks, elbows and head butts and managed to out fight them and win with 5% health left. You sweat your butt off and its a lot of fun.

Forget the bad reviews they are all WRONG, check user ratings they are all 8-10 out of 10, but the reviewers who play it for 1 hour without two move controlers give it 3-5 out of 10. Get this game or rent it, but get two move controllers and wear gym shorts and be ready to burn some fat.

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